Archives

Tour Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park

November 28, 2020 by Corey A Edwards

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State ParkTour the traditional Florida cracker homestead and farm of a Pulitzer Prize winning author at Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park.

Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (1896 – 1953) was a novelist and short story writer who published 12 books in her lifetime. “The Yearling” is her best known work. It won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1939 and was made into a major motion picture, starring Jane Wyman and Gregory Peck, in 1946. Other popular titles in her catalog include “Cross Creek,” “South Moon Under,” “Golden Apples,” and “The Sojourner.”

Even more exciting, most of those stories and books were written right here on the veranda!

Rawlings, who hated city life, moved to rural North Central Florida from New York with her husband in 1929. She loved old Florida country living and it infused much of her work. Her memoir, “Cross Creek,” for example, details her daily life at the historic farmstead.

Nothing beats visiting the real place, however. Luckily, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park is just a half hour’s drive from Hampton Lake Bed & Breakfast!

Read the rest of this page »

Micanopy Florida – The Little Town That Time Forgot

September 18, 2020 by Corey A Edwards

Micanopy FloridaMicanopy FL, a tiny town 12 miles south of Gainesville, is more than meets the eye. Not only is it Florida’s oldest, continually inhabited inland settlement, with 38 buildings on the National Historic Register, it’s also an antiquers paradise and served as backdrop for two major motion pictures.

Micanopy (Mick-ah-NO-pee) may be exceedingly small, with a one square mile footprint and just under 650 residents, but it’s also Old Florida at its best.

Massive live oaks draped in Spanish moss shade turn-of-the-century buildings housing antiques shops, gift shops, and outdoor cafes. In fact, nearly all of Micanopy is a historic district.

The town, named after the Seminole chief of the Second Seminole War, started out as an Indian trading post in 1821. While much of the town had to be rebuilt after the Second Seminole War in the 1830s, those buildings are now on the National Register of Historic Places.

Read the rest of this page »

facebook mail rss